A vast lawn was covered with folding chairs and furry beanbag loungers. Chloe x Halle, an R&B duo, sang a song and commanded the crowd to chant affirmations: “I am unstoppable,” “I am funny.”

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“She’s the dream editor, and I’m so excited to hopefully meet her and compliment her on her white boots,” one attendee said of Elaine Welteroth.

Credit
Kendrick Brinson for The New York Times

Ms. Welteroth, in a blush-colored dress, ascended the stage to a hero’s welcome. “Where my activists at?” she called, inciting cheers.

A keynote speaker was Hillary Clinton, interviewed by Yara Shahidi, a 17-year-old actress best known for her role on the sitcom “black-ish.” Ms. Clinton urged her audience to combat mansplaining (“Be willing to say, ‘I’m so glad John agrees with my idea’”) and adjust their expectations at the polls (“Don’t look for the perfect campaign and the perfect candidate”).

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Pins with activist messages adorned an attendee’s backpack.

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Kendrick Brinson for The New York Times

Attendees broke into smaller groups for workshops, “mentor sessions” and panels. Cindy Gallop, a British advertising consultant, told one of these smaller audiences that “we need to build our own financial ecosystem because the white male one isn’t working for us,”and suggested that would-be employees walk into salary negotiations with “a number in your mind so large, you almost want to laugh when you say it.”

Those who bought tickets for Friday’s program were also able to meet female bosses at the Los Angeles offices of Instagram, YouTube, Netflix and other companies.

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The actresses Storm Reid, center, and Rowan Blanchard, right, engaged their fans at the summit.

Credit
Kendrick Brinson for The New York Times

Hot merchandise included a $39 crop top that read “resist the gaslight.” Juicy Couture bedazzled velour track jackets (for Generation Z, everything ‘90s is new again).

On the lawn, Autumn De Forest, 16, an artist and a member of Teen Vogue’s 21 Under 21 list — the bar of public achievement getting so low one might limbo under it — bopped around with a new friend, Em Odesser, 17, the editor in chief of Teen Eye magazine (published quarterly). “This is the first time I’ve been in a teen-centric, girl-centric space,” said Ms. Odesser, who lives in a suburb of New York. “Our school, it’s very different from anything like this. I think safe spaces get a really bad rep. People see it as, ‘Aw, these liberal, triggered snowflakes,’ but to have a place where you can convene and create great things with each other is really, really important.”

Of Ms. Welteroth, Ms. Odesser said, “She’s the dream editor, and I’m so excited to hopefully meet her and compliment her on her white boots.”

Back on the lawn, a panel called “How to Be a Better Ally” was wrapping up. The sun was setting, and some girls had wrapped themselves in blankets. “Now is not the time to get tired,” commanded a hype man by the stage. “We are as woke as we were this morning, we are more woke than we were this morning.” There remained discussions, mentor sessions, workshops. Maxine Waters, the California congresswoman, would be on soon. There would be ice cream before her, and a poetry performance afterward.

“Old Karishma is not here anymore,” said Ms. Bhuiyan, springing up from a beanbag. “I’m totally new and improved. I want to go out and change the world right now, but, like, the event is still going on.”

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