And so the bowl that takes up the back half of the new Supreme store in Williamsburg, Brooklyn — which had its opening party on Thursday night — has some of the performative qualities of that Deitch Projects exhibit. (By coincidence, it was built by Steve Badgett, who worked on the Deitch Project bowl.) There is a bowl in Supreme’s Los Angeles store, too, but this one looms larger.

Within minutes of the party’s start, skaters were feeling out its contours, while nonskaters were taking to the cameras on their phones, to show the world that they were near skaters. The later it got, the more people were squeezed around the bowl’s rim, participants and observers in symbiosis.

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Zani Bici at the opening. “He knows how to skateboard,” said his father, Peter Bici, who was one of the first team riders for Supreme when the store first opened in 1994. “He sees me doing it so he likes it.”

Credit
Rebecca Smeyne for The New York Times

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Na-Kel Smith, 23, center, a professional skateboarder from Los Angeles. “I guess a lot of people talk to me about how I fall,” he said of his signature move. “I didn’t know there was a bowl in there, but I’m definitely going to skate.”

Credit
Rebecca Smeyne for The New York Times

Down on the floor, Supreme was showing off its latest collections, which include collaborations with the artist Andres Serrano, the Italian outerwear specialist Stone Island and the conglomerate Nike. There were things to be had for under $50, and also for more than 10 times that, reflecting the brand’s role as both entry point and end goal. It is also the raw material for a vibrant and thirsty resale ecosystem with prices that can rise exponentially on the internet’s gray markets.

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